Oregano Oil Research Part 3

Research Studies and Articles on
Health Benefits of Wild Oregano Oil

Oil of Oregano: An herb for all seasons by Ingri Cassel
Idaho Observer
Ever since oil of oregano came out as being a miracle cure for a variety of ailments, I began to hear personal testimonies from close friends and subscribers to The IO. After waiting over six months for one gentleman to write up his story using oil of oregano to resolve literally all of his health problems (a huge list being in his 80s), I decided to write an article on the benefits of this natural product myself.
And since I actually have my own testimony with a persistent ear infection that quite literally disappeared after 24 hours of treatment, I am more motivated than ever to incorporate oil of oregano into my daily regimen. Oregano oil has been touted as a remedy for everything from athlete’s foot to eczema and arthritis.
Most of us think of oregano as a culinary herb used primarily in Italian, Greek and Mediterranean cooking. Actually, there are many varieties of oregano. The oil extracted from the culinary herb is considered similar to the oil extracted from marjoram and basil, all belonging to the Labietea (mint) family of plants.
The miraculous virtues of oregano oil are attributed to the amount of carvacrol and thymol the oil actually contains. Carvacrol and thymol are the active ingredients giving the oil its reputable antiseptic properties. The culinary form of oregano, Origanum Compactum, contains about 45 – 65 percent carvacrol and thymol combined, depending on the location of the harvest and distillation methods used. However, it is the wild oregano, Origanum Vulgare, native to the south coast of Turkey and Greece on the Mediterranean Sea that is used for its miraculous medicinal properties, typically having combined carvacrol and thymol levels as high as 90 percent in some plants.
True oil of oregano offers many exciting remedies to a variety of ailments. In Steven Foster’s book Herbal Renaissance, oregano oil has “been employed to treat indigestion, diarrhea, nervous tension, insect bites, toothache, earache rheumatism, and coughs due to whooping cough and bronchitis (primarily for it’s antispasmodic effects).”
In Cass Ingram’s book The Cure is in the Cupboard, he notes that “wild oregano is a veritable natural mineral treasure-house, containing a density of minerals that would rival virtually any food.”
The wild oregano is rich in a long list of minerals that includes calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, potassium, copper, boron, and manganese. Vitamins C and A (beta carotene) and niacin also are contained in oregano. Judging from its mineral content alone, it isn’t hard to figure out why oregano is such a valuable commodity.
In another of Cass Ingram’s books, Supermarket Remedies, he states that “oregano is one of Nature’s finest preservatives.” He also suggests that if oregano is used with foods such as meat, eggs, milk, or salad, you “will greatly halt the growth of microbes and, thus, reduce the risk of food poisoning.”
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